Black Bottomed Oatmeal Pie

Often referred to as poor mans pecan pie this black bottomed oatmeal pie is a bit easier on the pockets that it’s nutty sibling.  A layer of chocolate ganache topped with a syrupy oatmeal filling sitting in a buttery crust makes this a truly rich and decadent dessert. There’s nothing poor about this pie.

Often referred to as poor mans pecan pie this black bottomed oatmeal pie is a bit easier on the pockets that it's nutty sibling. A layer of chocolate ganache topped with a syrupy oatmeal filling sitting in a buttery crust makes this a truly rich and decadent dessert. There's nothing poor about this pie.

This is my second recipe from the The Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book and man alive do those girls know their pies. Like a cross between a pecan pie and a giant chocolate chip oatmeal cookie, this pie ticks all of my boxes. It’s gooey, it’s rich and it’s absolutely banging with a big old scoop of vanilla ice cream.  Or as the Americans say, a la mode.

Making a pie crust puts me smack bang in the middle of my happy place. It’s such a therapeutic, methodic process.  Everything has to be handled just so, with the lightest of hands and the coldest of ingredients. I love the exactness. I see so many recipes championing store bought pastry but I never seem to have a good experience, it always shrinks and never tastes as good as from scratch. While it might seem like a lot of work to make your own, I really recommend you give it a go. Throw on some music or delve into a true crime podcast and just lose yourself in the process. If you really want top swot marks, double the ingredients and freeze half of the dough for future pie making endeavours.

Often referred to as poor mans pecan pie this black bottomed oatmeal pie is a bit easier on the pockets that it's nutty sibling. A layer of chocolate ganache topped with a syrupy oatmeal filling sitting in a buttery crust makes this a truly rich and decadent dessert. There's nothing poor about this pie.

There’s always one thing that puts me off making a traditional pecan pie, that’s right, the price. A big pack of pecan nuts can set you back close to a tenner, that’s all well and good for a special occasion, but when you just fancy a dessert without the hefty price tag, this black bottomed oatmeal pie has you covered. I mean, a bag of oats is like 75p, that’s a bit easier on the purse if you ask me.

Often referred to as poor mans pecan pie this black bottomed oatmeal pie is a bit easier on the pockets that it's nutty sibling. A layer of chocolate ganache topped with a syrupy oatmeal filling sitting in a buttery crust makes this a truly rich and decadent dessert. There's nothing poor about this pie.

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Black Bottomed Oatmeal Pie


  • Author: Katie Deacon
  • Prep Time: 1 hour plus chilling
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Total Time: -25709464.05 minute
  • Yield: 8
  • Category: Baking
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Often referred to as poor mans pecan pie this black bottomed oatmeal pie is a bit easier on the pockets that it’s nutty sibling.


Ingredients

For the Pie Crust:

  • 500g plain flour
  • 1tsp  salt
  • 225g cold butter, cut into small cubes
  • 75-100ml ice water

For the Filling: 

  • 150g rolled oats
  • 60ml double cream
  • 200g good quality plain chocolate, chopped
  • 150g light brown sugar
  • 1/2tsp salt
  • 75g unsalted butter, melted
  • 300g golden syrup
  • 1tsp vanilla extract
  • 2tsp cider vinegar
  • 4  large, free range eggs

Instructions

  1. First of all, make your pie crust. Whisk together the flour and salt in a large bowl.
  2. Drop the diced butter into the flour and work in in with your fingers, using a rubbing motion. You’re looking for pea sized chunks of butter scattered throughout the flour.
  3. Using a fork or your fingers, drizzle in the ice water a little at a time. When the dough starts to come together, squeeze it into a ball. If it looks too dry or pieces crumble off add a little more water and try again.
  4. Gather the dough into a ball, and divide it in half. Gently pat each half into a rough disk. This recipe makes double the amount you need here so wrap one half in clingfilm and stash in the freezer for next time you make a pie. Roll the remaining half out into a circle big enough to fit your pie tin, crimp the edges then place in the fridge for 30 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 175°C and remove your pie crust from the fridge. Using a large square of baking paper crumple it up and open it out. Place the paper in the hollow of your pie and fill with baking beans (or dried beans). Baking in the oven for 20 minutes then remove the paper and beans and bake for a further 5 minutes. Allow to cool fully before carrying on with the rest of the recipe.
  6. Spread the oats on a rimmed baking sheet and toast in the oven for 10 to 12 minutes, stirring occasionally. Set aside to cool. Reduce the oven temperature to 160°C.
  7. To make the ganache layer, using a in a heavy-bottomed saucepan bring the double cream just to a boil over medium heat. Remove from the heat and dump in the chocolate pieces. Swirl the cream around to distribute and cover the chocolate and let sit for 5 minutes. Stir gently until the chocolate is smooth and shiny. Scrape the ganache into the cooled pie shell and spread evenly over the bottom. Place the shell in the freezer to set the ganache while making the filling.
  8. In a large bowl, whisk together the brown sugar, salt, and melted butter. Add the golden syrup, vanilla, and cider vinegar and whisk to combine. Add the eggs one at a time, whisking well between each addition. Stir in the cooled oats.
  9. Place the ganache-coated pie shell on a rimmed baking sheet and pour in the filling. Bake on the middle of the oven for about 55 minutes. The pie is finished when the edges are set and puffed slightly and the centre is slightly firm to the touch but still has some give. Allow to cool completely on a wire rack, 2 to 3 hours. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature with lashings of cream.

Notes

If you want a real decedent treat, serve the pie still warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

17 Comments

  1. Sarah | Boo Roo and Tigger Too
    April 10, 2018 / 9:04 am

    I can recall my mum making this when I was a child. She always liked to have something in the tin in case of visitors.

  2. Amy - All about a Mummy
    April 10, 2018 / 10:31 am

    You had me at chocolate ganache. This looks like an epic pie! I love that the oats are cheaper than pecans.

  3. Helen J
    April 10, 2018 / 12:15 pm

    This looks delicious and the combination of chocolate, oats and pastry is a winner with me 🙂

  4. Sophie's Nursery
    April 10, 2018 / 1:47 pm

    This looks amazing! Totally agree that it's a much better price tag! x

  5. Michelle Twin Mum
    April 10, 2018 / 9:15 pm

    I've never heard of this but I'd happily indulge. It's like a chocolate flapjack in pastry – what more could I want? Mich x

  6. Éva Katona
    April 10, 2018 / 9:18 pm

    This looks so luxurious with the chocolate and sounds absolutely amazing. A real masterpiece of baking.

  7. Sarah
    April 10, 2018 / 11:48 pm

    Oh this looks AMAZING. I love chocolate and oats so this is a great combination for me x

  8. Hannah
    April 11, 2018 / 7:41 am

    This sounds and looks incredible. Your photography is fantastic. The cider vinegar is a very interesting twist but it bet it really works.

  9. Battle Mum
    April 11, 2018 / 8:52 am

    My dad regularly makes pies but mostly of the apple and melktart varieties. He makes his own pastry by hand and freezes leftovers like you and his pastry always tastes the same. I love a good pie!

  10. Kara Guppy
    April 11, 2018 / 11:54 am

    Oh goodness, this looks delicious, would love to make this

  11. Kaz | Ickle Pickles Life and Travels
    April 11, 2018 / 4:02 pm

    You can't beat a good pie and this looks pretty awesome! Kaz

  12. Life Unexpected
    April 11, 2018 / 5:46 pm

    Oh my this looks so delicious. I really, really want to make this. I love oats so much and anything chocolate has me sold.

  13. Kirsty Ralph
    April 11, 2018 / 7:03 pm

    It’s looks so amazing, I didn’t realise pecans can cost so much. I can’t say I’ve ever tried oatmeal so would be interested to experience the texture and flavour.

  14. Anosa
    April 12, 2018 / 8:39 am

    Not sure why its a poor man's dessert but it looks real yummy and something i can get into

  15. Beth @ BethinaBox.com
    April 13, 2018 / 11:45 am

    Oooh, this looks amazing! I love a good sweet pie. I'm not a lover of Pecans anyway but oats I know I like.

  16. Jordanne Lee
    April 14, 2018 / 8:12 pm

    What a delicious looking pie! It sounds really yummy and sounds easy to make as well. Might have to give this a try.

  17. Ashleigh - www.beingashleigh.com
    April 16, 2018 / 6:32 pm

    Looks super delicious and a great way to use up oats in the cupboard!

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