Easy Bakes - Maple Pecan Breakfast Pinwheels

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Sometimes the lure of being a domestic goddess is just too much to ignore.  That kickass double chooclate babka on pinterest, or those super cute rainbow bagels you saw on Buzzfeed, they look doable.  That is until you read the instructions, look at your watch and realise aint nobody got time for that, before pulling out a tube of ready made cookie dough from the back of the fridge and eating it raw.  

What if I can tell you there's a way to fake it?  Like these maple pecan breakfast pastries, they look pretty complex right? Wrong! They are the easiest, tastiest morsels ever and you can totally pretend to be the ultimate domestic goddess, drowning in compliments while you gush about your handmade pastries. Nobody needs to know they only took you ten minutes to whip up with ingredients you probably already have on hand.  

Fake your way into being a domestic godess with these super easy breakfast pastries.

I'll always recommend you use all butter puff pastry for everything, it just tastes better, and even better if you buy it in ready rolled sheets. Lazy girls unite!

There's no end to the wonderful concoctions you can whip up with just a sheet of puff pastry and a few other ingredients.  I've been in suffocating breakfast luxury for weeks.  I'll be sure to share some more of my creations with you guys soon.

Fake your way into being a domestic godess with these super easy breakfast pastries.



Maple Pecan Pinwheels

Ingredients
  • 1 Sheet of ready rolled all butter puff pastry
  • 150g Pecan nuts
  • 100g Dark brown suagr
  • 3tbsp Maple syrup
  • 25g Unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 Large egg, beaten with a little milk
  • 50g Apricot jam
  • 200g Icing sugar
  • 3tbsp Water
  • 1/2tsp Vanilla extract
Cooking Directions
  1. In a food processor pulse the pecans until finely chopped, you can also do this by hand just ensure the pieces are nice and fine. Pour the nuts into a bowl and mix with the maple syrup and melted butter, set aside while you prepare your pastry.
  2. Preheat the oven to 175C and line two baking trays with baking parchment.
  3. Unroll your chilled pastry and cut into six equal squares. Transfer your squares to the baking sheets, leaving room between each square. To shape the pinwheels cut a line from each corner of the square to almost the middle, leaving around a 3cm space uncut. Put a tablespoon of the pecan mixture into the center of each square before folding alternate corners into the middle of the pastry and pressing down. Make sure you work quickly as the dough becomes harder to work with the warmer it gets, the best way to combat this is to keep one tray in the fridge while working on the other.
  4. Brush each pastry with the beaten egg and bake for 18-20 minutes until golden brown and crisp. Allow to cool slightly.
  5. While cooling make your glaze. In a small saucepan heat the apricot jam with 2tbsp of water until runny. Combine the icing sugar and water until smooth and transfer to a piping bag, snip the end to make a small hole. Brush each pastry with the sticky glaze before drizzling with the icing.
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Bloody Halloween Cocktails

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A friend recently said to me 'Katie, in your house every day is Halloween.' She wasn't wrong! We're big fans of October 31st in this household and this year we'll be handing out candy, watching my favorite psycopath stalk his innocent camp councellors and sipping on these bloody beauties.  It'll be a graveyard smash!


A delicious mix of vodka, chamboard and pomegrannet juice these babies will have you in the Halloween spirit in no time.  You'll be itching to get out and party with those skelletons.



Bloody Halloween Cocktails
Ingredients
  • 100ml Vodka
  • 50ml Chamboard
  • 250ml Pomegranate Juice
  • 4 Tinned Lychees
  • 4 Blueberries
Cooking Directions
  1. To make the eyeballs simply pop a blueberry into the hollow of a tinned lychee and skewer two eyeballs onto a cocktail stick.
  2. In a cocktail shaker filled with ice, shake together the vodka, Chamboard and pomegranate juice.
  3. Strain into two ice filled glasses (top up with any remaining pomegranate juice)
  4. and garnish with your gruesome eyeballs. Enjoy.
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Robert Welch Knives & Camembert Pie

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The most important tool to a chef, or home cook, is a decent knife.  You can cook a stew over an open fire in the garden; but if you've got a rubbish set of knives you're not only adding time to your preperation, you're also dicing with the tips of your fingers.  A good set of knives has been high up on my kitchen wish list for quite some time, so when Steamer Trading got in touch askinng if I'd like to try out some of their best selling knives, I jumped at the chance.

Santoku Knife vs Cook's Knife, which do you prefer?

I was sent a 7" Santoku and a 5.5" Cook's knife from the Robert Welch collection.  To really put these babies to the test I decided to whip up a pie from this months Tesco magazine that contained the scourge of the chopping world, the butternut squash. Dun dun duuuun!!

Santoku Knife vs Cook's Knife, which do you prefer?

First I put the Santoku to the test.  I have to say, I much prefer this knife to the chefs kinfe.  It's much weightier and I feel I could really do some damage with this bad boy. No veg is too much for the Santoku.  The blade sailed through the tough flesh of the butternut squash, considering my old knife would get stuck around an inch in and I'd be forced to bash the squash on the bench to get the knife through.  Much better.

Santoku Knife vs Cook's Knife, which do you prefer?

The cook's knife is much smaller and lighter in the hand.  Where I feel I could take on any job with the Santoku I think I'd save the chefs knife for smaller, more delicate work.  I think dicing an onion with this little babe would be a dream come true!

Santoku Knife vs Cook's Knife, which do you prefer?




For me, I much prefer the Santoko to the cooks knife as I just enjoy the nice weighty feel in my hands.  I know alot of home cooks are more partial to a smaller knife, my mother for example only works with those tiny paring knives, what's up with that?!  What do you guys prefer?

Santoku Knife vs Cook's Knife, which do you prefer?

Find the recipe for this kick ass pie here.
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